Category Archives: Growing Good Food

In the Garden – Getting Ready for Spring

I visited my daughters’ school garden today and it looked great (see pics below)! Seeing everything growing so beautifully made be realizes that I need to start getting my garden in order.  Back in December I made a pledge to take back my garden from my dog Coco (Creating a Garden Where Vegetables and My Dog can Coexist), a 60lb Chocolate Lab, and I attend to stick to that pledge.

So, this weekend I am using some tips from EarthEasy.com “Garden Projects for Early Spring” to clean my garden to get it ready for Spring.

Are you trying to get your garden in shape?  Check out these 10 favorite garden design apps from the Gardenista, chosen to help you in the garden.

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Fruits and Vegetables In Season for February and Pick-Your-Own Farms

Here is what is in season for the San Francisco Bay Area for February.

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Also check out these Bay Area Pick-Your-Own Farms where you and your kids can go an pick all of this wonderful produce yourselves!

List provided by SFKids.org

Peninsula Coast and Santa Cruz County:
- Arata’s Pumpkin Farm, Half Moon Bay
- Gizdich Ranch, Watsonville
- Pastorino Farms, Half Moon Bay
- Phipps Country Store and Farm, Pescadero
- Rancho Siempre Verde Christmas Tree Farm, Pescadero
- Santa’s Tree Farm and Village, Half Moon Bay
- Swanton Berry Farm/Coast Ways Ranch, Davenport
- Webb Ranch Farm, Portola Valley

Sonoma County:
- Gabriel Farm, Sebastapol
- Larsen Christmas Tree Farm, Petaluma
- Peterson’s Farm, Petaluma

Contra Costa County:
- Alhambra Valley Tree Farm, Martinez
- Knoll Organics, Brentwood
- Peter Wolfe Ranch, Brentwood
- Smith Family Farms, Brentwood

A good website to check out is PickYourOwn.org where you will find a list of farms practically anywhere in the country, where your family can go and harvest fruits and vegetables

Want to save money and reduce food waste? Regrow your food scraps

Re-growing your food scraps is a easy way to reduce food waste and save money at the same time. Here are two of my favorites and most used veggies to regrow indoors. For best results, try to use organic produce because some chemicals can discourage sprouting.

Green Onions – I use this yummy veggie a lot and it is super easy to regrow indoors. Stick the white root base into a jar of water, making sure to leave the top of the plant above the water, and place it on your window sill or somewhere it will get plenty of sunlight.  Within three to five days the base will start to grow roots and the green part will start to grow back. Now simply trim off what you need and let the plant regrow again.  Make sure you change the water every few days, to keep your onions healthy. greenonions1

Ginger – Ginger is another easy root to regrow right in your kitchen. Take a section of the ginger root and plant it in soil, with the newest buds facing upward, where it will get indirect sunlight. Shortly after you plant it you will notice new growth sprouting up out of the soil. Once established and you need ginger for a recipe, simply pull it up, harvest some of the root and then replant it. Ginger

For more tips on re-growing your kitchen scraps visit Garden with Garbage: 10 Foods You Can Grow from Scraps and  Don’t Throw It, Grow It! 68 Windowsill Plants from Kitchen Scraps by Deborah Peterson

 

Creating a Garden Where Vegetables and My Dog can Coexist

As the end of the year approaches I am thinking about a spring garden full of yummy vegetables, herbs and fruit waiting to be harvested and eaten.  Alas, my chocolate lab, Coco who has taken over my backyard, brings me back to reality.  My goal for the New Year, not resolution, but goal is to reclaim my backyard and build a garden where a bounty of produce and Coco can coexist.

Here are some photos of my garden and Coco as well as links to some great information to help me with planning.  Are you thinking about starting or reviving your garden too?  Lets chronicle this journey together.

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How to Create a Dog-Friendly Garden

23 Common Flowers That Are Poisonous For Your Pet

Dog Friendly Gardening Tips

American Kennel Club Offers Tips On Dog-Friendly Gardening